Science of Persuasion by Influence at Work

Dear Lea Guangko

Published on Nov 26, 2012

For our latest, animated video from THE SMALL BIG, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S45ay…

To order a poster of the final screen shot, visit us here: http://www.influenceatwork.com/store/…

For more visit our blog at http://www.insideinfluence.com

Animation describing the Universal Principles of Persuasion based on the research of Dr. Robert Cialdini, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing, Arizona State University.

Dr. Robert Cialdini & Steve Martin are co-authors (together with Dr. Noah Goldstein) of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Business Week International Bestseller Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to be Persuasive.

US Amazon http://tinyurl.com/afbam9g
UK Amazon http://tinyurl.com/adxrp6c

IAW USA: http://www.influenceatwork.com
IAW UK: http://www.influenceatwork.co.uk/

 Marilyn Moore via Google+1 month ago

The Science of Persuasion and What It Means For Your Business

This extremely well-done (and entertaining) video by Robert Cialdini and Steve Martin,  outline 6 factors that affect people’s decision-making.They include:
1. Reciprocity
2. Scarcity
3. Authority
4.Consistency
5. Liking
6. ConsensusDiscover how each of these increases the likelihood that people will respond positively.  The most interesting thing is that you can increase that likelihood by small,  practical, often costless changes.Well worth a look!

John-Christian Andreassen 1 month ago Here you go:

1. Reciprocity 1:20
2. Scarcity 3:08
3. Authority 4:16
4. Consistency 6:05
5. Liking 7:45
6. consensus 9:05
Thank you for  sharing this video to our Science Blog I can easily see why you did so. We both find the video to be very important; aside from the content, the animation, too is very engaging.

I have copied and pasted the transcript of the video and I would like to you to edit this in such a way that it would look like a regular article. I am hoping that the text will add more dimension to the sharabilty of this most important post.

Many thanks,

Rom Cumagun

0:12
researchers have been studying the factors that influence us to see
0:16
yes to the requests others for over 60 years
0:20
in there can be no doubt that there’s a science
0:23
to how we are persuaded and a lot of this science
0:26
is surprising when making a decision it would be nice to think that people
0:31
consider all the available
0:32
information in order to guide their thinking but the reality
0:36
is very often different in the increasingly
0:40
overloaded lives we lead more than ever we need shortcuts
0:44
were rules of thumb to guide our decision-making
0:47
my own researchers identified just six above the shortcuts
0:51
as Universal’s that guide human behavior
0:55
they are reciprocity scarcity
0:59
authority consistency liking
1:03
in consensus understanding these shortcuts
1:06
in employing them in and ethical manner can significantly increase the chances
1:12
that someone will be persuaded by your request
1:15
let’s take a closer look it each intern
1:19
so the first universal principle influence
1:22
is reciprocity simply put people were obliged to give back to others the form
1:27
of behavior
1:28
gift or service that they have received first if a friend invite you to their
1:33
policy
1:33
there’s an obligation for you to invite them to a future party you are hosting
1:37
if a colleague does your favor the new oh that colleague a favor
1:41
in the context of the social obligation people are more likely to say yes to
1:46
those that they are
1:47
what are the best demonstrations are the principal reciprocation
1:52
comes from a series of studies conducted in restaurants so the last time you
1:56
visit a restaurant
1:57
there’s a good chance that the waiter or waitress will have given you a gift
2:00
probably about the same time that they bring your bill look you perhaps
2:05
or fortune cookie or perhaps a simple bit
2:08
so is the question does the giving amidst have any influence over how much
2:13
to tip you going to leave that
2:15
most people say no but that mean can make a surprising difference
2:19
in the study giving died as a single made at the end of the meal
2:23
typically increased tips by around three percent
2:27
interestingly if the gift is doubled in two minutes provided
2:31
tips don’t double the quadruple
2:35
a 14 percent increase in tips but perhaps most interestingly a fall
2:40
is the fact that is the way to provides one means stalls to walk away from the
2:43
table
2:44
but poses turns back and says for you nice people
2:48
he’s a extra mint tips go through the roof a 23 percent increase
2:53
influence nope by what was given but
2:56
how it was given so the key to using the principle of reciprocation
3:00
is to be the first to give and to ensure that what you give
3:03
is personalized and unexpected the second universal principle of persuasion
3:08
is scarcity
3:09
simply put people want more of those things they can have less self
3:13
when British Airways announced in 2003
3:17
that they would no longer be operating the twice-daily London New York
3:21
Concorde flight because it’d be calm on economical to wrong
3:26
sales the very next day talk of
3:29
notice that nothing had changed about the Concord itself
3:34
it certainly didn’t fly any faster the service didn’t suddenly get better
3:38
in the air fare didn’t drop it had simply become a scarce resource
3:43
and as a result people wanted it more
3:46
so when it comes to effectively persuading others using the scarcity
3:50
principal
3:51
the science is clear it’s not enough simply to tell people about the benefits
3:56
they’ll gain
3:57
if they choose your products and services you’ll also need to point out
4:01
what is unique
4:03
about your proposition and what they stand to lose
4:07
if they fail to consider your proposal
4:10
author principled influence is the principal have authority
4:13
the idea that people follow the lead of credible knowledgeable
4:17
experts physiotherapists for example
4:20
are able to persuade more their patients to comply with recommended exercise
4:24
programs
4:25
if they display their medical diplomas on the walls at the consulting group
4:30
people are more likely to give change for a parking meter to a complete
4:33
stranger
4:34
if that request to wears a uniform rather than casual clothes
4:39
what the science is telling us is that it’s important to signal so others
4:43
what makes you a credible knowledgeable authority before you make your
4:48
influence attempts of course this can present problems
4:52
you could hardly go around telling potential customers help bring you all
4:56
but you can certainly arrange for someone to do it for you
4:59
and surprisingly the science tells us that it doesn’t seem to matter if the
5:03
person who introduces you
5:05
is not only connected to you but also likely to prosper from the introduction
5:10
themselves one group real estate agents were able to increase both the number of
5:14
property appraisals
5:15
and the number of subsequent contracts that the roads
5:19
by arranging for reception staff who alt said customer enquiries
5:23
to first mention their colleagues credentials and expertise
5:27
so customers interested in letting a property were told
5:30
lettings let me connect you with Sondra who has over 15 years experience letting
5:35
properties in this area
5:37
customers who wanted more information about selling properties were told
5:40
speak to Peter ahead of sales he has over 20 years experience selling
5:44
properties
5:45
all put you through now the impact if these
5:48
expert introduction let’s wait twenty percent rise in the number appointments
5:52
and a 15 percent increase in the number sign contracts
5:56
not bad for a small change informed from persuasion science
6:00
that was both ethical and cost less to implement
6:04
the next principal is consistency people like to be consistent
6:09
with the things they have previously said or done
6:12
consistency is activated by looking for
6:15
and asking for small initial commitments that can be made
6:20
in one theme is set of studies researchers found rather unsurprisingly
6:24
that very few people would be willing to erect in on-site
6:28
leave wooden board on their front lawn to support
6:31
a drive safely campaign in their neighborhood
6:35
however in a similar neighborhood close by
6:38
four times as many homeowners indicated that they would be willing to erect this
6:43
on slightly billboard why
6:46
because ten days previously they had agreed
6:49
please a small postcard in the front window of their home
6:54
that signaled their support for a drive safely campaigning
6:58
that small card was the initial commitment
7:02
that led to a for 100 percent increase
7:05
in a much bigger but still consistent change
7:09
so when seeking to influence using the consistency principal
7:14
the detective influence looks for voluntary
7:17
active in public commitments and ideally gets those commitments
7:22
in writing for example one recent study
7:26
reduced missed appointments at health centres by
7:29
18 percent simply by asking the patient’s
7:33
rather than the staff to write down appointment details
7:37
on the future appointment card
7:40
the fifth principle is the principle of liking people prefer to say yes to those
7:45
that they like
7:46
but what causes one person to like another persuasion science tells us that
7:51
there are three
7:52
important factors we like people who are similar to us
7:56
we like people who pass compliments and we like people who cooperate with us
8:00
towards mutual goals
8:03
as more and more the interactions that we are having take place on line
8:07
it might be worth asking whether these factors can be employed
8:10
effectively in let’s say online negotiations
8:15
in a series of negotiations studies carried out between MBA students
8:19
two well-known business schools some groups were told
8:22
time is money get straight down to business in this group around 55 percent
8:27
were able to come to an agreement
8:29
a second group however we’re told before you begin negotiating
8:34
exchange your personal information with each other identify similarity you share
8:39
in common
8:40
then begin negotiating
8:43
in this group ninety percent of them were able to come to successful
8:47
an agreeable outcomes that would typically worth 18 percent more
8:51
to both parties so to harness this powerful principal love liking
8:56
be sure to look for a reserve similarity that you share with others
9:00
and genuine compliments you could give before you get down to business
9:05
the final principle is consensus especially when they are uncertain
9:10
people will look to the actions and behaviors a others
9:13
to determine their own you may have noticed that hotels often place a small
9:18
car did bathrooms
9:20
that attempt to persuade guests to reuse their towels and linen
9:25
most do this by drawing a guess the tension
9:28
to the benefits that we use can have on environmental protection
9:32
it turns out that this is a pretty effective strategy leading to around 35
9:37
percent compliance
9:39
but could there be any even more effective way
9:42
well it turns out that about 75 percent of people
9:45
will check into a hotel for four nights or longer will reuse their towels at
9:50
some point
9:51
during their stay so what would happen if we took a lesson
9:54
from the principle of consensus and simply included that information
9:58
on the cards and said that 75 percent
10:02
of our guests reuse their towels at some time during their stay
10:06
so please do so as well it turns out that when we do this
10:10
towel reuse rises by 26 percent
10:15
now imagine the next time you stay in a hotel you saw one of these signs
10:19
you picked it up in you read the following message
10:23
75 percent of people who have stayed in this
10:26
ruling every use thereto
10:30
what would you think well here’s what you might think
10:34
I hope they’re not the same tells and like most people
10:38
you probably think that this sign will have no influence on your behavior
10:41
whatsoever
10:43
but it turns out that changing just a few words on a sign
10:47
to honestly point out what comparable previous guests have done
10:51
was this single most effective message
10:54
leading to a 33 percent increase
10:58
in reuse so the science is telling us
11:02
that rather than relying on our own ability to persuade
11:05
others we can point to what many others are already doing
11:10
especially many similar others
11:13
so there we have it 6 scientifically validated principles
11:17
persuasion to provide for small practical
11:21
often cost less changes the complete a big differences
11:25
in your ability to influence and persuade others in an entirely ethical
11:28
way
11:29
they all secrets from the sides of persuasion
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